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Draft Open Space and Recreation Strategy - June 2011

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4.0 Provision of Open Space across the City

Introduction

View Comments (1) 4.1 This section of the Draft Strategy discusses the findings of the Open Space and Recreation Assessment. It breaks the information down by ward and provides data on the deficits in each ward and the ward’s strengths and weaknesses in terms of open space provision. It also discusses the level of provision proposed in the urban extensions to the City, which have not been assessed in this Draft Strategy as they have not yet been delivered on site. An indicative map of the existing Protected Open Space in the City and the proposed provision in the urban extensions is set out in Appendix 4.

No Comments 4.2 Across the City, there are some 736.11 hectares of Protected Open Space on 286 sites2, of which 346.63 hectares on 154 sites are publicly accessible. Overall, this equates to approximately 6.2 hectares of Protected Open Space per 1,000 people based on mid-2009 population estimates, of which 2.9 hectares per 1,000 people is publicly accessible. This can be compared to the existing standard for all open space provision through new residential development of 3.3 hectares per 1,000 people (3.7 hectares per 1,000 people in the urban extensions as allotments are included). Open spaces are not evenly distributed, with many suburbs experiencing a relative paucity of open space in comparison with the City Centre and the west of the City.

View Comments (2) 4.3 Within the City, Protected Open Spaces have been sub-divided into categories, given their main purpose. Table 1 below indicates the amounts of each typology of open space. The abbreviation used for each type of site is included in the table. This abbreviation is use as part of the unique number for each site, e.g. AGS 32 would be Amenity Green Space 32 - Fanshawe Road Amenity Green Space.

No Comments Table 1: Primary function of open spaces in Cambridge

Typology Sites Total Hectares
Allotments (A)
22
35.87*
Amenity Green Space (AGS)
69
34.45
Cemeteries and Churchyards (CEM)
12
17.70
Provision for children and young people (CYP)
28
5.24
Natural and Semi-Natural Green Spaces (NAT)
36
167.55
Parks and Gardens (P&G)
56
257.78
Outdoor Sports Facilities (SPO)
63
217.52
Total 286 736.11
*Excludes Victoria Almshouses (categorised as AGS 51 due to the amount of amenity green space on site for residents) and Histon Road Allotments (located within South Cambridgeshire, but functionally and geographically contiguous with the City).

Green corridors are not included within the table above as each green corridor in the city is split down into different sites of a range of typologies.

Future Provision of Open Space in the Urban Extensions

View Comments (1) 4.4 A key aspect of the development strategy for the Cambridge area is a number of major new urban extensions to the City. The 2003 Cambridgeshire and Peterborough Structure Plan required a review of the Cambridge Green Belt to release land for the long term development needs of Cambridge, in specified locations and subject to the purposes of the Cambridge Green Belt (Structure Plan policy P9/2b). The required review of the Cambridge Green Belt has already been completed through the development plans of the City Council and of South Cambridgeshire District Council. These plans have released land to meet the long-term development needs of Cambridge at the southern fringe, at North West Cambridge and at Cambridge Airport. Many of the urban extensions include land in both Cambridge City Council and South Cambridgeshire District Council’s administrative areas. They are at various stages of implementation, with some having obtained planning permission. The urban extensions to Cambridge create additional demands for access to open spaces at the same time as providing opportunities to deliver new areas of open space, both strategic and local. These areas play a key role in linking the urban area with the surrounding countryside.

View Comments (1) Cambridge Southern Fringe: Trumpington Meadows

4.5 Trumpington Meadows comprises 1,200 new homes alongside supporting facilities. It lies within both Cambridge City and South Cambridgeshire District Councils’ areas, and is allocated in the Cambridge Local Plan 2006 and South Cambridgeshire’s Cambridge Southern Fringe Area Action Plan. Planning permission was granted in 2009. Throughout the residential development there will be ‘green fingers’ – areas of open space that extend into the development from the arable fields to the south and country park to the west. All ‘green fingers’, except one which runs above the main gas pipeline, will be planted with two rows of trees to create avenues. Pocket parks and greens will also be provided throughout the development. A new riverside community park (Country Park) is to be provided along the River Cam extending north and south of the M11 motorway. It will include a variety of habitats, including wet and dry meadowland and woodland alongside tussocky grassland at the river edge. There will be two balancing ponds within the Country Park, sited on land to the north of the M11 and east of the River Cam, and new planting around the balancing ponds. Shared cycle and pedestrian routes will be provided, linking the Country Park to the built up area. The two parts of the Country Park on either side of the M11 will be linked by a cycle and footpath using the existing bridge over the motorway, and there will be a good network of informal footpaths across the park. Land directly to the south and south west of the built up area will remain in arable use and be rented out to local farmers. The illustrative land strategy within the Design and Access Statement accompanying the planning application seeks to break up these large fields between the M11 and the development edge into smaller fields that replicate the old pattern of field boundaries. New trees will be planted within the new hedgerow boundaries to break up the expanse of arable fields and improve biodiversity.

No Comments Cambridge Southern Fringe: Bell School

4.6 This site lies entirely within Cambridge’s administrative area and comprises 347 residential units and 100 units of student accommodation. It is allocated in the Cambridge Local Plan 2006 and received planning approval, subject to a Section 106 agreement, in 2008. Bell School has informal open space centred around two balancing ponds along the southern edge, the provision of allotments, play areas and pocket parks together with a central linear informal space ending in a crescent on its southern end and a landscaped area adjacent to Greenlands on its northern end. The layout provides an opportunity for an attractive pedestrian link with views out to the countryside beyond the site, including the Gog Magogs to the south. The open spaces on Bell School are not in themselves strategic in nature. As a part of the greater offer of the Southern Fringe, Bell School’s open space forms a local part of the strategic provision of open space for the South of the City.

No Comments Cambridge Southern Fringe: Clay Farm

4.7 This site lies entirely within Cambridge’s administrative area and provides 2,300 new homes and a mixture of other supporting uses. It is allocated in the Cambridge Local Plan 2006 and planning permission was granted in 2010. This site is an important gateway to Cambridge and will form a new edge to the City. Landscape and open space are key elements of overall character of the proposed development, with the existing trees, plantations, hedges, Hobson’s Brook and associated ditches characterising the development, and providing the background around which the new landscape will be designed. The green corridor provides the transition between the urban fabric and the open countryside to the south, and remains in the Green Belt. A transition is proposed within this corridor from formal recreation/open space adjacent to Long Road to informal open space further south to merge with the countryside character beyond. This is achieved with the majority of active uses located north of The Busway’s Addenbrooke’s spur. South of The Busway spur will comprise wet/dry balancing ponds, a permanent wetland feature, informal species rich grassland and tree planting primarily along the western and southern edges. An allotment site of 1 hectare is included on the western edge of the southern section.

View Comments (1) Cambridge Southern Fringe: Glebe Farm

4.8 This site lies entirely within Cambridge’s administrative area and provides for residential development of just under 300 homes. It is allocated in the Cambridge Local Plan 2006 and planning permission was granted in 2010. The public open space is spread across three main areas: a central open space, a western open space and an eastern open space, each of which contains a play area. The layouts and play specification for the spaces provide for a range of different ages, from toddlers to teenagers. The open space on the northern side of the site is much less animated and smaller in scale and seeks to implement a native tree planting mix with a wildflower seeded area along its northern edges. Along the sides of the site that face Hauxton Road and the Addenbrooke’s Access Road is a buffer of native structural landscaping arranged in a series of thickets. The allotments are provided at the very eastern side of the site and are sub-divided by a roadway and potential strategic pedestrian/cycle link to Exeter Close. A number of pedestrian and cycle links are provided at regular intervals, and a strategic link is provided centrally that meets with Bishop’s Road and crosses to meet Hauxton Road further north. The open spaces on Glebe Farm are not in themselves strategic in nature. As a part of the wider Southern Fringe, Glebe Farm’s open spaces form a local part of the strategic provision of open space for the South of the City.

View Comments (1) Cambridge Southern Fringe: Addenbrooke’s 20:20

4.9 The site lies within Cambridge’s administrative area but is highly visible from public vantage points beyond the City to the south and the west and is flat, exposed and relatively featureless. The Cambridge Local Plan allocates this area for enhancements to Addenbrooke’s Hospital as part of the creation of a wider Cambridge Biomedical Campus, which received planning permission in 2009. It is set against the backdrop of the existing hospital, which appears as a mass of institutional buildings with minimal landscaping. Long distance views of the site are most evident from the Gog Magog Down to the south. The Addenbrooke’s site has a number of proposed areas of public realm within it and provides scope for informal areas for relaxation. The site links with the wider City and the surrounding countryside via strategic footpath and cycleway routes. As with Bell School and Glebe Farm, smaller open spaces will contribute to the high-quality sustainable environment being created in the Southern Fringe.

View Comments (1) North West Cambridge: Land between Huntingdon Road and Histon Road (NIAB1)

4.10 A park is proposed in the centre of this development of 1780 dwellings within Cambridge’s boundaries and a green corridor is proposed along the outer boundary of the development that runs between Cambridge and South Cambridgeshire. The site is allocated in the Cambridge Local Plan 2006 and planning permission was granted in 2010 subject to a legal agreement, although the frontage area has a separate permission and construction began in Spring 2010. The green corridor along the boundary will include the retained hedgerows and additional planting, the existing definitive footpath linking Huntingdon Road and Histon Road, an additional cycle route and new drainage facilities which take the form of swales, ditches or ponds. A park will be provided in the centre of the development, near the community centre and linked to two of the green corridors that cross the site. This park will contain sports pitches, landscaped areas for informal play and recreation, drainage facilities including drains or swales along the edges of the park and wetland areas. Children’s play areas will be provided throughout the site. Some of the open spaces are purely local in nature, whilst the green corridor has a more strategic role.

View Comments (3) North West Cambridge: Land between Madingley Road and Histon Road

4.11 Land in Cambridge and South Cambridgeshire has been released from the Green Belt specifically to address the long-term development needs of the University of Cambridge. The joint North West Cambridge Area Action Plan provides for academic and research and development facilities, accommodation for 2,000 students and 3,000 dwellings, half of which will be for University key workers. A large central area of open space will be provided in the strategic gap between the two parts of the site, which will be retained as Green Belt. There will also be a substantial open landscaped area between the development and the M11, retained in the Green Belt. The Plan requires improved linkages into the wider countryside and other areas of publicly accessible open space such as the Coton Countryside Reserve and the NIAB 1 and 2 developments. The open spaces which make up the green corridor and the strategic gap are of strategic importance.

View Comments (2) Cambridge East

4.12 The joint Cambridge East Area Action Plan sets out the planning requirements for this site which lies within both Cambridge and South Cambridgeshire, and which plans for 10,000 to 12,000 new homes in the area based on the Cambridge airport site. Whilst the urban quarter as a whole requires the airport to relocate, the Plan identifies potential for early development north of Newmarket Road and north of Cherry Hinton with the Airport remaining on site. In addition to the creation of strategic routes connecting Green Infrastructure in the City with the surrounding districts and key projects such as Wicken Fen Vision, a Country Park is proposed to the east of Airport Way, as part of the development of this site as a new urban quarter for Cambridge. An urban park is also proposed on the existing Park and Ride Site, along with a range of smaller open spaces and allotments. A Green Corridor will be retained through the new urban quarter, linking Coldham’s Common with the wider countryside. This corridor is retained as Green Belt.

Ward Assessment

View Comments (1) 4.13 A simple way of assessing the adequacy of the amount of existing open space provision is to compare the quantity of provision in an area with its population. In principle, this is a sensible approach, except that ward boundaries are essentially arbitrary and not all local communities identify with them. In addition, a ward can appear to be poorly provided for, but have very good provision just outside its boundary.

No Comments 4.14 However, it is considered relevant to provide information on Protected Open Spaces at a ward level as this approach allows data to be viewed at a more comprehensible level. Ward profiles can also be combined to view provision at an Area Committee level, if necessary.

View Comments (2) 4.15 Each ward profile contains the following information:

View Comments (2) 4.16 Additionally, following the descriptive text, each ward profile also has a map showing the location and number of each area of Protected Open Space within the ward and an accompanying list of the Protected Open Spaces by number and name. The table of sites also indicates whether the sites are publicly accessible or are private, requiring membership of a College or allotment society for example. State schools have currently been categorised as public, based on the availability of community access to these sites outside school hours. This is not intended to reflect public access within school hours, which could compromise the well-being of pupils. The number of hectares occupied by each site is also noted. Despite not being generally publicly accessible, the many private open spaces in Cambridge are essential components of the City’s character; providing a setting for the City’s many historic buildings; offering a recreational resource for their users, e.g. students and staff of a College; supporting biodiversity and supplying a green lung to the surrounding area.

No Comments 4.17 A number of the ward maps show Protected Open Spaces that span two or more wards. Any cross-boundary Protected Open Space is shown on the maps of each ward, but is only shown on one ward list in order to avoid double-counting of the site’s area. For example, the Lakes adjacent to Cherry Hinton Brook (NAT 28) fall into more than one ward, but are only listed under Coleridge ward as the majority of the land area is within Coleridge. This approach has been used throughout the document.

View Comments (1) 4.18 Where opportunities are expressed in the ward profiles, they are intended to be illustrative rather than exhaustive. If allocated or windfall sites come forward for residential development in wards where there are clear deficiencies in publicly accessible open space, the development should be required to provide high quality provision on site, unless it can be clearly demonstrated that this is not possible. If provision cannot be secured on site, financial contributions should be paid in order to enhance open space in the locality to allow it to support a greater number of users. Site allocations will be reviewed as a part of the review of the Local Plan.

View Comments (4) 4.19 As a result of the presentation of the Draft Open Space and Recreation Strategy at Development Plan Scrutiny Sub-Committee on 12th July 2011, a number of additional sites were suggested by Councillors. These sites include a number of private gardens and a civic space:

The sites mentioned above will be the subject of assessment prior to the Draft Open Space and Recreation Strategy being presented at Environment Scrutiny Committee. If anyone has any questions regarding the assessment of these sites, they should contact the Planning Policy team during the consultation period to progress discussion.

4.20 View Comments (2) Abbey Ward Profile

Total Population (2009): 9,360
Protected Open Space hectares per 1,000 population: 12.3 hectares (89.5% of which is publicly accessible open space)
Description: The ward has a mix of housing types and land uses, with much of the western part of the ward made up of retail and industrial uses along Newmarket Road. The area between the river and Newmarket Road up to Stanley Road is predominantly 19th century housing, with a mix of 20th and 21st century housing up to the railway. The 20th century housing estate areas in the ward consists of a mix of flats, terraced and semi-detached housing. Some of the flatted blocks have little or no access to gardens. The ward is bounded by commons and other open spaces to the north and the south-east. To the north, Stourbridge Common and Ditton Meadows are contiguous, providing an extensive green corridor, which runs adjacent to the River Cam into the heart of the City. Cambridge Airport forms the south-eastern edge of the ward with the open areas of closely cut grassland adjacent to the runway linking the notional countryside with Coldham’s Common and the former gravel quarries and Cherry Hinton Hall through to the chalklands to the south.
Strengths: In comparison to the majority of the City, Abbey ward contains a good mix of publicly accessible open spaces. In addition to the presence of a number of allotments and children’s play spaces, there is good access to the nearby commons and sports facilities at the Abbey Pools complex.
Weaknesses: Although the amount of open space provision is comparatively good and the areas of open space are well-used, the quality of the open spaces is very varied, with the quality of maintenance only average on Ditton Fields (AGS 04), the Dudley Road Recreation Ground (AGS 06) and the Velos Walk Play Area(CYP 14). A number of sites in the ward, including Silverwood Close (AGS 33) suffer from fly-parking on the edges of amenity green space. On Coldhams Common (P&G 22), the relationship between the common and the adjacent football ground (SPO 07) is poor due to the hostile environment created by high security fencing and hard landscaping.
Opportunities: Children’s play spaces on Peverel Road and at Abbey Pools Complex need significant improvement. River Lane Play Area only provides for toddlers, but is used by older children as they have no alternative space within the site.
Enhancement of Barnwell West Local Nature Reserve to improve access and reduce fly tipping and damage caused by recreational dog walkers.
Development of Cambridge East with significant open space and recreation provision.
Threats: Potential for loss of football pitch at Cambridge United FC.

View Comments (1) Protected Open Spaces in Abbey Ward

Site No. Site Name Public/Private Size
A 05 Elfleda Road Allotments Private 4.29
A 13 New Street Allotments Private 0.47
A 26 Peverel Road Allotments Private 1.08
AGS 04 Ditton Fields Recreation Ground Public 0.64
AGS 06 Dudley Road Recreation Ground Public 0.80
AGS 07 Thorpe Way Play Area Public 1.16
AGS 33 Silverwood Close Amenity Green Space Public 0.16
AGS 36 Amenity Green Space outside 73 - 87 Peverel Road Public 0.19
AGS 37 Amenity Green Space outside 33 - 47 Peverel Road Public 0.18
AGS 38 Rawlyn Road Amenity Green Space Public 0.24
AGS 39 Jack Warren Green large Amenity Open Space Public 0.24
AGS 40 Jack Warren Green small Amenity Green Space Public 0.15
AGS 56 Ditton Lane Amenity Green Space Public 0.26
AGS 63 Fison Road Amenity Green Space Public 0.30
AGS 71 Peverel Road Small Amenity Green Space Public 0.07
AGS 72 Barnwell Road Amenity Green Space Public 0.04
AGS 73 Wadloes Road Amenity Green Space Public 0.32
AGS 75 Whitehill Close Amenity Green Space Public 0.25
CEM 03 Newmarket Road Cemetery Public 7.82
CYP 12 Peverel Road Play Area Public 0.41
CYP 14 Velos Walk Play Area Public 0.09
CYP 28 River Lane Play Area Public 0.01
NAT 07 Stourbridge Common Public 19.38
NAT 08 Barnwell Pit (lake) Private 2.45
NAT 09 Barnwell Junction Pasture and disused Railway Private 2.97
NAT 10 Ditton Meadows Public 15.85
NAT 30 Barnwell East Local Nature Reserve Public 3.26
NAT 31 Barnwell West Local Nature Reserve Public 4.02
P&G 22 Coldhams Common Public 44.74
SPO 01 Barnwell Road Recreation Ground Public 0.56
SPO 07 Cambridge United FC Private 0.84
SPO 39 Abbey Meadows Primary School Public 2.00
Total 115.24

View Comments (1) Abbey Ward Map

Map 1

4.21 View Comments (1) Arbury Ward Profile

Total Population (2009): 9,280
Protected Open Space hectares per 1,000 population: 0.81 hectares (98% of which is publicly accessible open space)
Description: Situated to the north of the City Centre, Arbury predominantly consists of flatted blocks, terraced and semi-detached housing dating from the late 1950s onwards, with pockets of older terraced housing close to the City Centre. The ward has the lowest levels of Protected Open Space in the City. Although the amount of publicly accessible open space is high relative to the amount of Protected Open Space, the types of open space are limited. Adjacent to the ward, Jesus Green (P&G 09) and Arbury Local Centre Play Area (CYP 16) are accessible for residents of Arbury.
Strengths: The St. Alban’s Road Recreation Ground (P&G 19) at the northernmost point of the ward has a community centre, sports pitch and children’s play space located on the same site. This site is used extensively by local residents.
Weaknesses: The Play Area behind 70 - 80 Hazelwood Close (CYP 05) and Hazelwood Close Toddler Play Area (CYP 18) are both in very poor condition with significant disrepair evident. Given their relatively isolated locations, they have been subject to vandalism. CYP 05, in particular, was unappealing for children. Greater consideration should be given to allocation of children’s play spaces.
Poor distribution of open spaces of any quality or size close to areas of housing.
Opportunities: Site 5.07 Willowcroft, Histon Road and Site 5.17 295 Histon Road are both allocated for housing in the Cambridge Local Plan 2006. If these sites were to come forward for their allocated use, the quality and quantity of open space made available on site should be high in line with the Council’s standards in order to avoid further negative impact on deficiencies in publicly accessible open space in both Arbury and Castle wards.
Blandford Way Play Area (AGS 01) is currently very limited with two play items for toddlers. This space could be considerably better used if more thought was given to equipment.
Opportunities to improve the quality of green spaces close to flatted blocks and to consider consolidating children’s play spaces onto larger, better-overlooked sites.
Threats: Ongoing damage to green spaces.

View Comments (1) Protected Open Spaces in Arbury Ward

Site No. Site Name Public/Private Size
AGS 01 Blandford Way Play Area Public 0.18
AGS 27 Ferrars Way Amenity Green Space Public 0.10
AGS 28 Harris Road Amenity Green Space Public 0.24
AGS 45 Harvey Goodwin Gardens Private 0.18
AGS 46 Redfern Close Amenity Green Space Public 0.22
AGS 68 Borrowdale Amenity Green Space Public 0.17
CEM 05 Histon Road Cemetery Public 1.38
CEM 10 St Giles’ Churchyard Public 0.11
CEM 12 St Luke’s Churchyard Public 0.24
CYP 05 Play Area behind 70 - 80 Hazelwood Close Public 0.07
CYP 18 Hazelwood Close Toddler Play Area Public 0.07
P&G 01 Alexandra Gardens Public 1.15
P&G 19 St Albans Road Recreation Ground Public 2.09
P&G 28 Jubilee Gardens Public 0.56
SPO 48 St Luke’s Primary School Public 0.79
Total 7.55

View Comments (1) Arbury Ward Map

Map 2

4.22 View Comments (7) Castle Ward Profile

Total Population (2009): 7,750
Protected Open Space hectares per 1,000 population: 10.1 hectares (7% of which is publicly accessible open space)
Description: Situated to the north-west of the City Centre, Castle ward is bisected by Huntingdon Road. Between the south-western side of Huntingdon Road and Madingley Road, College uses dominate, with Colleges such as Fitzwilliam, Churchill and Murray Edwards having significant presences within the streetscene. All the Colleges within this area have established and well-maintained gardens, whilst some Colleges also have extensive playing fields within the ward. Residential uses within this area predominantly consist of large detached houses with large gardens.
To the north-east of Huntingdon Road, terraced housing dominates, with limited pockets of publicly accessible open space.
Strengths: The open spaces associated with the Colleges can be glimpsed travelling through the area, adding to the greenness of the ward.
Histon Road Recreation Ground (P&G 08) is well-maintained, accessible from different directions, has high quality play equipment for all ages, and has patches of semi-natural green space. Castle Mound, a scheduled ancient monument, provides an opportunity to view the City’s skyline and allows people to appreciate the historic context of the City.
Weaknesses: The main challenge in Castle ward is the level of public access to Protected Open Spaces. Although some residents of the ward will be associated with the Colleges and will have access to the College gardens and playing fields, many residents in Castle, particularly those in the north of the ward, have very limited access, with Histon Road Recreation Ground providing the most sizable piece of public open space in the area.
Opportunities: Whilst the NIAB and North West Cambridge sites will provide open space primarily for the residents of the sites themselves, it is anticipated that nearby residents of Castle ward will make use of the range of open spaces to be offered at both NIAB and North West Cambridge. Both sites will allow better access to the countryside beyond.
Access to the Travellers’ Rest Pit SSSI (NAT 24) will be enhanced as a result of the development at North West Cambridge.
Threats: The loss of or deterioration of existing open spaces.
Loss of College sports pitches.

View Comments (13) Protected Open Spaces in Castle Ward

Site No. Site Name Public/Private Size
AGS 30 Northampton Street Amenity Green Space Private 0.09
AGS 58 Sherlock Close Amenity Green Space 2 Private 0.19
AGS 59 Sherlock Close Amenity Green Space 1 Private 0.16
AGS 60 Westminster College Private 1.12
AGS 70 Carisbrooke Road Amenity Green Space Public 0.25
CEM 08 All Souls Lane (Ascension) Cemetery Public 0.93
CEM 11 St Peter's Churchyard Public 0.11
CYP 15 Albion Yard Children's Play Area Public 0.13
NAT 17 Madingley Rise Meadow Private 1.86
NAT 20 Conduit Head Road Lake Private 0.81
NAT 24 Traveller's Rest Pit (SSSI) Private 3.71
P&G 08 Histon Road Recreation Ground Public 1.80
P&G 23 St John's College Gardens Private 11.39
P&G 24 Royal Observatory Private 3.10
P&G 29 Magdalene College Gardens Private 1.30
P&G 32 Trinity College Gardens Private 7.48
P&G 41 Wychfield Private 1.74
P&G 42 Lucy Cavendish College Gardens Private 1.30
P&G 43 Fitzwilliam College Gardens Private 1.46
P&G 44 Murray Edwards College Gardens Private 2.69
P&G 45 Castle Mound Public 1.17
P&G 47 St Edmund’s College Gardens Private 2.95
P&G 48 Trinity Hall Gardens Private 1.10
P&G 49 Gonville & Caius College Gardens Private 0.81
P&G 54 Trinity College Fellows Garden Private 2.37
P&G 55 Trinity College - Burrell's Field Private 1.48
SPO 10 Churchill College Grounds Private 9.06
SPO 19 Fitzwilliam College Playing Fields Private 2.61
SPO 46 St John's & Magdalene Colleges Playing Field Private 10.31
SPO 51 Trinity Hall Playing Field Private 3.89
SPO 58 Mayfield Primary School Public 1.10
Total 78.47

View Comments (8) Castle Ward Map

Map 3

4.23 View Comments (2) Cherry Hinton Ward Profile

Total Population (2009): 8,740
Protected Open Space hectares per 1,000 population: 7.71 hectares (58% of which is publicly accessible open space)
Description: The ward has a mix of housing types and land uses, with industrial uses located on the northern edge of the ward adjacent to Cambridge Airport and office and research and development uses on Fulbourn Road. The rest of the ward predominantly consists of 20th century housing, with the original village core still evident along the High Street. This ward is bounded by a range of open spaces to the north and west, which form part of a green corridor running through to adjacent Abbey Coleridge and Romsey wards. To the south and east, the Cambridge Green Belt bounds the built-up area, with a number of sites of local and national nature conservation importance forming the edge of the built-up area of the City.
Strengths: Cherry Hinton has a good range of open spaces, including the parkland of Cherry Hinton Hall, sports provision within recreation grounds, high quality allotment provision and a range of natural and semi-natural green spaces, which form a strong green corridor. In recent years, improvements have been made to the East Pit (NAT 15) in order to enhance biodiversity and reduce damage from off-road biking.
Weaknesses: Many of the natural and semi-natural green spaces are not well-managed and maintained. Whilst a balance should be sought between access and biodiversity, the sites adjacent to the lakes (NAT 11, 32 and 26) are suffering from poor quality maintenance. On some of the sites, self-set trees are taking over, reducing the biodiversity of the scrubland. The most significant problem, however, relates to access. There is obvious demand to enter the lakes from adjacent sites, including the Spinney Primary School and Cherry Hinton Brook. This desire for access has given rise to vandalism and other anti-social behaviour.
Opportunities: Improvements to facilities at Cherry Hinton Hall – this need has already been recognised through the masterplanning work undertaken for the site.
Improvement of access to currently restricted natural and semi-natural green spaces.
If land adjacent to Hatherdene Close comes forward for housing, there are opportunities for open space to be provided within the site.
Development of Cambridge East with significant open space and recreation provision.
Threats: Further deterioration in quality of natural and semi-natural green spaces.

View Comments (2) Protected Open Spaces in Cherry Hinton Ward

Site No. Site Name Public/Private Size
A 04 Dawes Lane Allotments Private 2.21
A 11 Wenvoe Close Allotments and Paddock Private 0.87
AGS 35 Fulbourn Road Amenity Green Space Public 1.14
AGS 41 Queen's Meadow Amenity Green Space Public 0.23
CEM 04 Church End Cemetery (St Andrew's Church) Public 1.08
CYP 13 Reilly Way Play Area Public 0.10
CYP 23 Ainsdale Children's Play Area Public 0.05
CYP 27 Kathleen Elliott Way Children’s Play Area Public 0.02
NAT 03 Limekiln Close Local Nature Reserve Public 2.86
NAT 14 West Pit SSSI (Limekiln Caravan Club) Public 4.91
NAT 15 East Pit (south of Limekiln Close LNR) Public 8.10
NAT 16 Lime Kiln Hill Reservoirs Private 3.39
NAT 26 Meadow and Small Wood (Peterhouse) - South of Hayster Drive Private 0.95
NAT 32 Hayster Drive Open Space Private 0.57
NAT 36 Giant’s Grave Public 0.37
NAT 37 Former Landfill Site West of Norman Way Private 11.59
NAT 38 Former Landfill Site East of Norman Way Private 8.86
P&G 03 Cherry Hinton Hall Public 14.12
P&G 04 Cherry Hinton Recreation Ground Public 2.90
P&G 26 Church End Green Space Public 1.15
SPO 13 Colville County Primary School Public 0.55
SPO 42 Spinney County Primary School Public 0.87
SPO 67 Cherry Hinton Infants School Public 0.50
Total 67.39

View Comments (1) Cherry Hinton Ward Map

Map 4

4.24 View Comments (4) Coleridge Ward Profile

Total Population (2009): 8,550
Protected Open Space hectares per 1,000 population: 5.72 hectares (34.6% of which is publicly accessible open space)
Description: Coleridge has a mix of housing types and land uses, with leisure and industrial uses located on the western edge of the ward and some retail and industrial uses located on Cherry Hinton Road at the southern edge of the ward. The 19th and 20th century housing development in the ward has a small number of flatted blocks and areas of terraced housing mingled with streets of semi-detached housing.
Strengths: Coleridge Recreation Ground (P&G 07) is used extensively by local residents, including many dog-walkers, people with young children and a number of sports teams. As the largest and most varied, publicly accessible Protected Open Space in the ward, it offers a vitally important resource to local people. Despite its strengths and the level of use, there is still significant scope for improvement of facilities on site. The paddling pool attracts many visitors in the summer months and should be maintained effectively.
Weaknesses: St Thomas’ Road Play Area (CYP 10) is situated to the rear of housing off St. Thomas’ Road. In addition to its poor siting, the condition of the site is poor, with vehicles regularly driving across the land and some evidence of anti-social behaviour.
The Lakes adjacent to Cherry Hinton Brook (NAT 28) are in a mix of ownerships and are not publicly accessible. Although the lakes are both deep and dangerous, due to the crumbling nature of the banks and the lack of surveillance, they are frequently accessed informally from a number of access points.
Opportunities: Site 5.02 The Paddocks Trading Estate and Site 5.08 Territorial Army site on Cherry Hinton Road are both allocated for housing in the Cambridge Local Plan 2006. If these sites were to come forward for their allocated use, the quality and quantity of open space made available on site should be high in line with the Council’s standards in order to avoid further negative impact on deficiencies in publicly accessible open space in Coleridge ward.
Threats: Further expansion of Coleridge Community College, Ridgefield Primary School and St. Bede’s School with related loss of open space.

View Comments (1) Protected Open Spaces in Coleridge Ward

Site No. Site Name Public/Private Size
A 03 Burnside Allotments Private 3.34
A 07 Fanshawe Road Allotments Private 0.62
A 16 Perne Road Allotments Private 0.68
AGS 31 Davy Road Amenity Green Space Public 0.22
AGS 32 Fanshawe Road Amenity Green Space Public 0.18
AGS 47 Rustat Avenue Amenity Green Space Public 1.24
CYP 10 St Thomas’ Road Play Area Public 0.30
NAT 11 Spinney - Blue Circle Private 0.65
NAT 28 Lakes adjacent to Cherry Hinton Brook Private 26.72
P&G 07 Coleridge Recreation Ground Public 5.08
SPO 12 Coleridge Community College Playing Fields Public 2.16
SPO 44 St Bede's School Public 7.74
Total 48.93

View Comments (2) Coleridge Ward Map

Map 5

4.25 View Comments (2) East Chesterton Ward Profile

Total Population (2009): 8,830
Protected Open Space hectares per 1,000 population: 2.66 hectares (63.7% of which is publicly accessible open space)
Description: Whilst the north-east of East Chesterton ward contains many employment and industrial uses, the south-west of the ward is mainly occupied by housing, with some retail uses along Chesterton High Street. Older housing is concentrated around Chesterton High Street and Ferry Lane, with 20th century housing forming much of the rest of the ward between the River Cam and Milton Road. Although there is not a high level of provision of open space within the ward, almost two-thirds is publicly accessible.
Strengths: The ward has a significant amount of allotment provision, with one particularly large site at Pakenham Close (A15). There is a range of open space of different types with access to a number of natural and semi-natural green spaces both within and adjacent to the ward. Chesterton Recreation Ground (P&G 05) is one of the ward’s main assets, with scope for formal and informal use of the space, with pitch provision and a children’s play area suitable for a range of ages.
Weaknesses: Causeway Park (P&G 30) is in very poor condition. The site is rough grassland with few trees and paths. The site seems to lack any real purpose. The Pye Meadow site (AGS 61) is also in poor condition at the moment, although it is understood that the Council is looking to provide new pitch provision on part of the site, which should improve the use and condition of part of the site.
Opportunities: Consideration should be given to how Causeway Park functions and what improvements could be made to improve its use, safety and attractiveness.
Paths across Chesterton Recreation Ground should be improved to allow better access on the clear desire line between Longworth Avenue and Church Street.
Delivery of further open space if the Shirley School site comes forward for housing.
Threats: Further deterioration in quality of open spaces.

View Comments (1) Protected Open Spaces in East Chesterton Ward

Site No. Site Name Public/Private Size
A14 Nuffield Road Allotments Private 2.58
A15 Pakenham Close Allotments Private 4.84
A21 Maple Close Allotments Private 0.06
A22 Kendal Way Allotments Private 0.10
AGS 08 Green End Road Recreation Ground Public 0.90
AGS 11 Scotland Road Recreation Ground Public 0.39
AGS 15 Brownsfield Recreation Ground Public 0.47
AGS 54 Pearl Close Large Amenity Green Space Public 0.08
AGS 61 Pye Meadow Public 4.13
CEM 07 St Andrews Church Cemetery Public 1.02
CYP 19 Pearl Close Toddler Play Area Public 0.04
CYP 25 Discovery Way Children’s Play Space Public 0.13
NAT 01 Bramblefields Local Nature Reserve Public 2.20
NAT 04 Logans Meadow Local Nature Reserve Public 1.11
NAT 13 Lynfield Lane Private 0.70
P&G 05 Chesterton Recreation Ground Public 2.30
P&G 30 Causeway Park Public 0.68
SPO 43 St Andrews Primary School Public 1.52
SPO 65 Chesterton Bowls Club Private 0.24
Total 23.49

View Comments (1) East Chesterton Ward Map

Map 6

4.26 View Comments (1) King’s Hedges Ward Profile

Total Population (2009): 8,260
Protected Open Space hectares per 1,000 population: 3.06 hectares (100% of which is publicly accessible open space)
Description: Predominantly 1960s and 1970s estate housing with numerous three and four storey flatted blocks. The ward is peppered with small areas of amenity green space adjacent to housing. Open spaces are more limited close to Milton Road, with the largest parks located in the north-western end of the ward.
Strengths: Edgecombe Flats Green (P&G 25) provides one of the few natural and semi-natural green spaces in the ward with copses of trees. The two largest recreation grounds at King’s Hedges (P&G 10) and Nun’s Way (P&G 15) are sizable spaces and are used extensively.
Weaknesses: Whilst most of the children’s play areas are in a usable condition, the play area on Hawkins Road (CYP 20) is very poor. Consideration should be given to removing the play equipment or completely rethinking the provision in this area.
King’s Hedges County Primary School has a very poor playing pitch. Although the playing space is sufficient, the quality of the turf is very low and the ground is uneven. This is not helped by the playing pitch having been built on the foundations of the former school buildings.
Opportunities: Both King’s Hedges and Nun’s Way Recreation Grounds have the potential to be very pleasant spaces and are used by local residents, but both suffer from damage due to vandalism and anti-social behaviour.
Beales Way Play Area (CYP 02) would benefit from a better range of play equipment and improvement to the level of maintenance of the site.
Cameron Way Play Area (CYP 01) would benefit from enhancement of seating and hard landscaping in particular.
There are many amenity green spaces around flats which could be enhanced with trees and more landscaping.
Threats: Further deterioration in quality of open spaces.
Loss of playing pitch space due to any future expansion of St Laurence’s and King’s Hedges schools and Manor Community College.

View Comments (1) Protected Open Spaces in King’s Hedges Ward

Site No. Site Name Public/Private Size
AGS 16 Campkin Road/St Kilda Avenue Public 1.36
AGS 18 Land at end of Moyne Close Public 0.14
AGS 19 Land west of 43 Ashvale Public 0.07
AGS 20 Minerva Way Amenity Green Space Public 0.15
AGS 21 Walker Court Amenity Green Space Public 0.45
AGS 65 Hanson Court Amenity Green Space Public 0.42
CYP 01 Cameron Road Play Area Public 0.19
CYP 02 Beales Way Play Area Public 0.25
CYP 03 Ramsden Square Play Area Public 0.29
CYP 16 Arbury Local Centre Play Area Public 0.43
CYP 20 Hawkins Road Children's Play Area Public 0.08
P&G 02 Arbury Town Park Public 1.66
P&G 10 King's Hedges Recreation Ground Public 3.90
P&G 15 Nun's Way Recreation Ground Public 4.65
P&G 25 Edgecombe Flats Green Public 1.43
SPO 21 Grove Primary School Public 1.6
SPO 25 Kings Hedges County Primary School Public 1.08
SPO 30 Manor Community College Playing Fields Public 5.41
SPO 47 St Laurence Catholic Primary School Public 1.77
Total 25.33

View Comments (1) King’s Hedges Ward Map

Map 7

4.27 View Comments (3) Market Ward Profile

Total Population (2009): 8,460
Protected Open Space hectares per 1,000 population: 7.82 hectares (60.7% of which is publicly accessible open space)
Description: This area includes the commercial core of the City, which is surrounded by Colleges, University and residential buildings. Beyond these buildings are the River Cam and a number of open spaces. Apart the residential provision of the Colleges and larger townhouses on streets like Park Terrace, much of the rest of the housing is terraced. The residential areas of the ward benefit from being located close to open spaces such as Christ’s Pieces (P&G 06), Jesus Green (P&G 09), Midsummer Common (P&G 12) and Parker’s Piece (P&G 09).
The open spaces in the ward include a number of the City’s parks and many of the City’s older College grounds.
Directly adjacent to Peterhouse on the edge of Market ward, Coe Fen (NAT 06) is an valuable area of open space, which provides a green foreground to the historic core, is an important semi-natural green space and hosts a key cycle route.
Strengths: The open spaces in this area make a considerable contribution to the City and to the setting of the historic core of Cambridge. They allow a range of views across different parts of the City and provide a peaceful contrast to the bustle of the City Centre.
Market Ward contains a number of important City-wide resources in the form of Christ’s Pieces (P&G 06); Parker’s Piece (P&G 16); Jesus Green (P&G 09); and Midsummer Common (P&G 12). Christ’s Pieces serves local residents, but is also important to people from further afield, due to its proximity to the Drummer Street Bus Station.
Within Market, there are a number of Colleges with associated gardens and sports facilities. The quality of the open space provision on these sites is extremely high. However, these open spaces have limited public accessibility.
Weaknesses: As the publicly accessible open spaces in the City Centre attract many visitors, the level of littering and damage to sites is particularly high in the summer months, despite attempts made to resolve these issues, e.g. through the introduction of barbeque stones.
Opportunities: Site 7.08 New Museums Site and Site 7.10 Mill Lane/Old Press Site are both allocated in the Cambridge Local Plan 2006 for redevelopment/refurbishment for predominantly University uses, with enhancement of the public realm. However, due to the density and type of development expected, the number and size of open spaces are likely to be limited.
Threats: Deterioration in the quality of publicly accessible open spaces due to high levels of use.

View Comments (8) Protected Open Spaces in Market Ward

Site No. Site Name Public/Private Size
A 01 Auckland Road Allotments Private 0.30
CEM 09 St Mary the Less Churchyard Public 0.17
NAT 29 Emmanuel College Gardens Private 3.09
P&G 06 Christ’s Pieces Public 4.07
P&G 09 Jesus Green Public 11.74
P&G 12 Midsummer Common Public 13.80
P&G 13 New Square Public 0.77
P&G 16 Parker’s Piece Public 9.63
P&G 33 Christ’s College Gardens Private 3.09
P&G 34 Peterhouse Gardens Private 2.83
P&G 36 Pembroke College Gardens Private 1.53
P&G 52 Sidney Sussex College Gardens Private 1.52
P&G 56 Corpus Christi College Gardens Private 1.23
SPO 24 Jesus College Gardens Private 8.36
SPO 63 Downing College Gardens Private 4.06
Total 66.19

View Comments (8) Market Ward Map

Map 8

4.28 View Comments (12) Newnham Ward Profile

Total Population (2009): 8,450
Protected Open Space hectares per 1,000 population: 14.7 hectares (24.7% of which is publicly accessible open space)
Description: Situated to the west of the City Centre, Newnham is characterised by significant levels of open space, much of it playing fields for the Colleges. The northern part of the ward has a number of spacious streets inhabited by large mainly detached houses and University and College buildings. The southern part of the ward includes the Newnham Croft area where many of the streets are made up of terraced housing, with some larger houses on Barton and Millington Roads. The ward lies adjacent to the countryside, with areas of Green Belt running through and around the built-up area. Many of the open spaces are vital to the setting of the City and the quality of the Cambridge Green Belt.
Strengths: The Backs with their interplay of grand College buildings and the well-treed landscape form Cambridge’s most famous landscaped area. To the south, the semi-natural areas of Sheep’s Green and Coe Fen have a totally different character, but provide an important wildlife and recreational resource and contribute significantly to the setting of the ward and its buildings between the historic core and the urban edge of the City. In addition to being home to many Colleges and their gardens, there are a considerable number of College and University playing pitches. The ward contains two of the City’s rugby clubs, Cambridge University RUFC (SPO 53) and Cambridge RUFC (SPO 05) and the University Athletics Track (SPO 52). On Lammas Land (P&G 25), the mix of activities, including the paddling pool, allows visitors to stay for long periods of time.
Weaknesses: Although the ward is host to many Protected Open Spaces, only approximately 25% of open spaces are publicly accessible.
Opportunities: Penarth Place Play Area (CYP 04) would benefit from a better range of play equipment.
Threats: Loss of sports pitch provision and College gardens due to expansion of Colleges.

View Comments (22) Protected Open Spaces in Newnham Ward

Site No. Site Name Public/Private Size
AGS 25 Cripps Court, Selwyn College Private 0.35
AGS 26 Gonville & Caius (Finella) Private 1.36
AGS 62 The Pightle and Principals Lodge Private 0.50
AGS 67 Pinehurst Private 2.72
CYP 04 Penarth Place Play Area Public 0.29
NAT 05 Paradise Nature Reserve Public 2.53
NAT 06 Sheeps Green & Coe Fen Public 20.61
NAT 18 Barton Road Lake Private 1.22
NAT 19 Meadow Triangle near Wilberforce Road and Cycle Way Public 0.62
NAT 22 Adams Road Sanctuary (lake) Private 1.70
NAT 23 M11 Verge and scrub east of M11 Private 2.27
NAT 35 The Grove Private 0.97
P&G 11 Lammas Land Public 5.45
P&G 31 Queens' College Private 5.61
P&G 35 King’s College Private 9.71
P&G 37 Ridley Hall Grounds Private 0.40
P&G 38 Gonville & Caius Fellows Garden Private 0.81
P&G 39 Selwyn College Gardens Private 2.26
P&G 40 Newnham College Gardens Private 2.12
P&G 50 Clare College Gardens Private 4.77
P&G 53 Robinson College Gardens Private 3.93
SPO 05 Cambridge Rugby Football Club Private 8.55
SPO 06 Cambridge Tennis & Hockey Club Private 2.41
SPO 14 Corpus Christi Playing Fields Private 4.29
SPO 16 Emmanuel College Playing Field Private 4.02
SPO 20 Gonville & Caius College Playing Field Private 2.71
SPO 26 King’s College School Private 1.76
SPO 33 Newnham College Playing Field Private 1.76
SPO 34 Newnham Croft Primary School Public 1.16
SPO 35 Pembroke, Peterhouse, Downing, St Catherine's & Christ's College Playing Field Private 11.30
SPO 41 University Croquet and Tennis Club (Cocks & Hens Lawn Tennis Club) Private 0.89
SPO 50 Trinity College Playing Field Private 3.90
SPO 52 University Athletics Track Private 7.52
SPO 53 University Rugby Club Private 1.77
SPO 54 University Rugby Club Practice Ground Private 1.25
SPO 66 Trinity College Hockey Field Private 0.62
Total 124.11

View Comments (14) Newnham Ward Map

Map 9

4.29 View Comments (3) Petersfield Ward Profile

Total Population (2009): 7,770
Protected Open Space hectares per 1,000 population: 1.53 hectares (65.3% of which is publicly accessible open space)
Description: Lying to the south-east of the City Centre, this densely built-up ward is home to the Cambridge campus of Anglia Ruskin University, retail and employment uses in addition to a considerable amount of residential development. Much of the housing provision consists of older terraced housing, with some pockets of 20th century development. Most gardens are relatively small and narrow and there is little in the way of street trees given the densely urban nature of the area.
Strengths: Compact high-density residential neighbourhoods with strong identity and sense of place. In addition to its role as a graveyard, Mill Road Cemetery (CEM 06) is used extensively for recreation by local people and is also important for wildlife. Peter’s Field (AGS 12) has recently been refitted with new children’s play equipment and soft landscaping has been cut back, which have both given rise to significant improvements in the quality of the space.
Weaknesses: Limited amount of Protected Open Space, of which approximately two-thirds is publicly accessible. Although there is a range of publicly accessible open spaces close to the ward including Parker’s Piece and Coldham’s Common, the amount of informal open space in the ward is low given the local population density and natural and semi-natural green space is restricted to Mill Road Cemetery (CEM 06). There is no publicly accessible formal outdoor sports provision within Petersfield.
Opportunities: Improvements to St. Matthew’s Piece dependent on the future of the Howard Mallett Centre.
Site 5.09 Travis Perkins is allocated in the Cambridge Local Plan 2006 for housing. If these sites were to come forward for their allocated use, the quality and quantity of open space made available on site should be high in line with the Council’s standards in order to avoid further negative impact on any deficiencies in publicly accessible open space in Petersfield.
Threats: Deterioration in the quality of open spaces.
Further expansion of St. Matthew’s Primary School with associated loss of play space.

View Comments (2) Protected Open Spaces in Petersfield Ward

Site No. Site Name Public/Private Size
AGS 05 Donkey Common Public 0.69
AGS 12 Peter’s Field Public 0.89
AGS 14 Ravensworth Gardens Public 0.25
AGS 34 Staffordshire Gardens Amenity Green Space Public 0.10
AGS 48 St Matthew’s Gardens Public 0.44
AGS 53 Fazeley House Amenity Green Space Private 0.24
AGS 66 Hughes Hall Amenity Green Space Private 0.22
CEM 06 Mill Road Cemetery Public 3.99
CYP 06 Ainsworth Street Play Area Public 0.03
CYP 07 Ravensworth Gardens Toddler Play Area Public 0.07
CYP 08 Flower Street Play Area Public 0.10
CYP 09 Shenstone Play Area Public 0.08
CYP 21 St Matthew's Primary School Public 0.36
P&G 20 St Matthew’s Piece Public 0.76
SPO 18 Fenners Cricket Ground Private 3.66
Total 11.88

View Comments (2) Petersfield Ward Map

Map 10

4.30 View Comments (5) Queen Edith’s Ward Profile

Total Population (2009): 8,750
Protected Open Space hectares per 1,000 population: 6.89 hectares (49.8% of which is publicly accessible open space)
Description: Apart from the presence of Addenbrooke’s, Homerton College and a number of state and private schools, Queen Edith’s ward is predominantly residential in nature, with housing of a range of ages and types. The northern part of the ward is more densely developed, with areas adjacent to Hills Road and south of Queen Edith’s Way having larger houses set in more spacious gardens. Barring natural and semi-natural green spaces, the range of open spaces within the ward is varied and the southern boundary includes land within the Cambridge Green Belt. However, only 3.43 hectares of Protected Open Space per 1,000 population is accessible to local people. Some of the ward lies in the Cambridge Green Belt and forms part of the setting of the City.
Strengths: Within Queen Edith’s, levels of allotment provision are reasonable. Both allotment sites are used extensively and are well located for access. Nightingale Avenue Recreation Ground (P&G 14) has a good range of facilities and is clearly visited by many local residents. Sports facilities at Netherhall School are accessible to the wider community.
Weaknesses: The distribution of publicly accessible open space within the ward is not even. The western portion of the ward is dominated by open spaces in private use. Whilst some will allow paid entry, others are generally inaccessible to the ward’s wider population. Whilst the condition of Nightingale Avenue Recreation Ground is generally good, the pavilion is in poor condition and the pitches may be subject to heavy usage for formal sports as a result of the loss of sports provision at Bell School.
Opportunities: The ongoing development of Addenbrooke’s will involve the delivery of open spaces for use by patients, visitors and staff.
Enhancement of the pavilion at Nightingale Avenue Recreation Ground and of the children’s play spaces at Gunhild Way (CYP 11) and Holbrook Road (CYP 24).
Threats: Loss of further playing field provision as a result of school or College expansion at Queen Edith’s, Queen Emma, the Perse and Netherhall Schools, and Homerton College.

View Comments (2) Protected Open Spaces in Queen Edith’s Ward

Site No. Site Name Public/Private Size
A 02 Baldock Way Allotments Private 1.50
A 10 Holbrooke Road Allotments Private 2.34
AGS 55 Faculty of Education Private 0.72
CYP 11 Gunhild Way Play Area Public 0.32
CYP 24 Holbrook Road Children’s Play Area Public 0.30
NAT 25 Netherhall Farm Meadow Private 0.51
P&G 14 Nightingale Avenue Recreation Ground Public 5.09
P&G 17 Bell School of Language Private 1.98
P&G 46 Homerton College Grounds Private 8.94
SPO 22 Hills Road Sports Centre (Tennis Courts) Private 0.65
SPO 29 Long Road Sixth Form College Public 7.15
SPO 31 Netherhall School (South) Public 11.68
SPO 32 Queen Emma Primary School Public 4.33
SPO 37 Perse School For Boys Playing Field Private 8.58
SPO 40 Queen Edith Primary School Public 1.12
SPO 59 Cantabrian Rugby Football Grounds Private 5.05
Total 60.26

View Comments (2) Queen Edith’s Ward Map

Map 11

4.31 View Comments (3) Romsey Ward Profile

Total Population (2009): 8,950
Protected Open Space hectares per 1,000 population: 1.18 hectares (36% of which is publicly accessible open space)
Description: Densely built-up, predominantly residential environment to the south-east of the City Centre. Much of the housing provision consists of terraced housing, although there are pockets of semi-detached housing in the northern part of the ward. Most gardens are relatively small and narrow and there is little in the way of street trees given the densely urban nature of the area.
Strengths: Significant level of allotment provision within the ward, although this provision is also used by people living outside the ward, particularly Stourbridge Grove. Romsey Recreation Ground has a wide range of facilities suitable for children of all ages and is subject to high levels of usage.
Weaknesses: Apart from the relatively informal pitch provision on Romsey Recreation Ground, there is no formal sports provision in Romsey. However, Coleridge Community College and Coleridge Road Recreation Ground are relatively close to the ward. The amount of informal open space in the ward is low given the local population density and the amount of natural and semi-natural green space is very low and is restricted to tree belts within Romsey Recreation Ground and Brooks Road Play Area.
Opportunities: Site 7.12 Former Magnet Warehouse on Mill Road is allocated for housing, community facilities and student housing in lieu of affordable housing in the Cambridge Local Plan 2006. If this site comes forward for its allocated use, the quality and quantity of open space made available on site should be high in line with the Council’s standards in order to avoid further negative impact on deficiencies in publicly accessible open space in Romsey ward.
Threats: Inadequate open space delivered as a result of new residential development coming forward and deterioration in the quality of existing open spaces.

View Comments (1) Protected Open Spaces in Romsey Ward

Site No. Site Name Public/Private Size
A 06 Fairfax Road Allotments Private 1.64
A 12 Vinery Road Allotments Private 1.48
A 17 Stourbridge Grove Allotments Private 3.47
AGS 02 Brooks Road Play Area Public 0.29
AGS 09 Montreal Square Public 0.07
AGS 13 Nuttings Road Amenity Green Space Public 0.44
AGS 44 Mill Road Amenity Green Space Private 0.16
AGS 74 Hampden Gardens Amenity Green Space Public 0.2
P&G 18 Romsey Recreation Ground Public 2.81
Total 10.56

View Comments (1) Romsey Ward Map

Map 12

4.32 View Comments (3) Trumpington Ward Profile

Total Population (2009): 7,420
Protected Open Space hectares per 1,000 population: 11.6 hectares (18.7% of which is publicly accessible open space)
Description: Trumpington Ward is varied in character with older terraced housing situated closest to the City Centre, larger detached housing and private schools dominating the eastern side of Trumpington Road between the Brooklands Avenue junction and the village of Trumpington. The western side of Trumpington Road contains fields used for sport, recreation and agriculture, which run down to the River Cam. The nucleus of Trumpington village contains both Anstey and Trumpington Halls and established houses and cottages. To the east of the village centre, the area predominantly consists of post-war housing. Although, a significant proportion of the open space in the ward is not publicly accessible, many of the private Protected Open Spaces can be viewed from the streetscene and contribute to the greenness of the ward. Many of the open spaces to the west of Trumpington Road are vital to the setting of the City and the quality of the Cambridge Green Belt.
Strengths: The ward has a good mix of different types of Protected Open Space. Many of the sites contribute to the green corridor of open spaces which runs through from the Clay Farm site up to Lammas Land and the green corridor running down from Paradise Local Nature Reserve through Grantchester Meadows along the River Cam.
Weaknesses: Whilst many of the sports fields within the ward are of a good standard, the level of accessibility to sports provision is not high.
Opportunities: Whilst the residential sites at Glebe Farm, Clay Farm and Trumpington Meadows will provide open space primarily for the residents of the sites themselves, it is anticipated that nearby residents of Trumpington ward will make use of the range of open spaces to be offered at the sites.
Site 5.06 British Telecom, Long Road is allocated for housing in the Cambridge Local Plan 2006. If this site comes forward for its allocated use, the quality and quantity of open space made available on site should be high in line with the Council’s standards in order to avoid further negative impact on any deficiencies in publicly accessible open space in Trumpington ward.
Threats: Loss of playing field sites to other forms of development without appropriate replacement facilities.

View Comments (3) Protected Open Spaces in Trumpington Ward

Site No. Site Name Public/Private Size
A 08 Foster Road Allotments Private 2.08
A 09 Empty Common Allotments Private 1.65
AGS 23 Southacre Amenity Green Space Private 0.87
AGS 29 Anstey Way Amenity Green Space Private 0.13
AGS 42 Brooklands Court Amenity Green Space Private 0.11
AGS 57 Accordia Amenity Green Space Private 2.10
AGS 64 St Mary’s Amenity Green Space Private 0.30
CEM 01 Trumpington Church Extension Churchyard Public 0.39
CEM 02 Trumpington Church Cemetery (St Mary & St Michael's Church) Public 0.46
NAT 02 Byrons Pool Public 3.07
NAT 12 Wetland Area (Perse School Playing Fields) Private 0.30
NAT 33 Empty Common (Copses and Pastures) Public 2.81
NAT 34 Brookside Private 0.56
P&G 21 Trumpington Recreation Ground (King George V Memorial Playing Field) Public 4.06
P&G 27 Cambridge University Botanic Garden Private 16.40
P&G 51 Anstey Hall Private 3.92
SPO 03 Cambridge Football Stadium Public 1.43
SPO 11 Clare College Playing Fields Private 6.54
SPO 15 Cambridge University Press Playing Fields Private 3.21
SPO 17 Fawcett Primary School Public 3.84
SPO 27 Leys School Playing Field Private 3.94
SPO 28 Leys & St Faiths Schools Playing Field Private 7.94
SPO 36 Perse Preparatory School (Peterhouse) Private 3.65
SPO 38 Perse School for Girls Playing Field Private 1.78
SPO 45 St Faith’s Playing Field Private 2.29
SPO 49 St Mary's School Playing Field Private 2.03
SPO 60 Cambridge Lakes Golf Course Private 7.91
SPO 61 Cambridge & County Bowling Club Private 0.58
SPO 62 Perse Preparatory School Private 1.60
Total 85.95

View Comments (3) Trumpington Ward Map

Map 13

4.33 View Comments (3) West Chesterton Ward Profile

Total Population (2009): 8,510
Protected Open Space hectares per 1,000 population: 1.26 hectares (79.8% of which is publicly accessible open space)
Description: West Chesterton is mainly residential in nature, with some retail and office uses located around Mitcham’s Corner and a number of school sites in the north of the ward. The southern part of the ward largely comprises Victorian housing, with a range of dwelling types from small terraced workers’ cottages to suburban villas. The housing in the northern part of the ward is generally younger than that of the southern part of the ward and is predominantly semi-detached set in larger plots.
Strengths: Given the age of development and the size of gardens, some areas of the ward appear quite verdant. The block of school playing fields serving Castle School; Arbury and Milton Road Primary Schools and Chesterton Community College contribute significantly to the amount of open space available in the ward.
Weaknesses: There is a limited range of open spaces available within the ward itself. Although other Protected Open Spaces such as Alexandra Gardens (P&G 01) Chesterton Recreation Ground (P&G 05), Jesus Green (P&G 09) and Jubilee Gardens (P&G 28) are close to the ward, there is very little informal open space and space for children and teenagers.
Opportunities: Improvements to children’s play space, particularly Chestnut Grove Recreation Ground (CYP 22) and Bateson Road Play Area (CYP 17).
Site 5.15 Henry Giles House is allocated for housing in the Cambridge Local Plan 2006. If this site comes forward for its allocated use, the quality and quantity of open space made available on site should be high in line with the Council’s standards in order to avoid further negative impact on any deficiencies in publicly accessible open space in West Chesterton ward.
Threats: Loss of Cambridge City Football Club without re-provision of facilities.

View Comments (1) Protected Open Spaces in West Chesterton Ward

Site No. Site Name Public/Private Size
A18 Bateson Road Allotments Private 0.12
A 25 Hawthorn Way Allotments Private 0.15
AGS 22 College Fields Amenity Green Spaces Public 0.56
AGS 49 Mulberry Close Amenity Green Space Private 0.19
AGS 50 The Beeches Amenity Green Space Public 0.08
AGS 51 Victoria Almshouses Allotments and Amenity Green Space Private 0.87
AGS 52 Victoria Park Private 0.13
CYP 17 Bateson Road Play Area Public 0.07
CYP 22 Chestnut Grove Recreation Ground Public 0.32
CYP 26 Castle School Playground Public 0.64
SPO 02 Cambridge City Football Club Private 0.71
SPO 04 Arbury County Primary School Public 1.08
SPO 08 Chesterton Community College Public 0.75
SPO 55 Chesterton Community College Playing Field Public 3.93
SPO 56 Milton Road Primary School Public 1.16
Total 10.76

View Comments (1) West Chesterton Ward Map

Map 14


2 Over 350 sites were assessed in Spring 2011, but a number were discounted as they did not meet the criteria for environmental or recreational importance.

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